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Corporate Offer - Cycle Hub

Greater Manchester’s Bee Network increases to 1,800 miles as £134m of new cycling and walking schemes announced

Lee Howarth

One year on from the launch of its proposals for the UK’s largest cycling and walking network, Transport for Greater Manchester (TfGM) has today published an updated Bee Network map which has seen the total length of the network increase by 77% - from almost 1,000 miles to more than 1,800 miles. The total number of new and upgraded crossings has also increased from 2,000 to 2,400.

The changes to the Bee Network map have taken into account feedback from local authorities and the 4,000 public comments received when it was first published in June last year.

TfGM also today announced that a total of 15 new Bee Network cycling and walking schemes with a total value of £134m will be considered by Greater Manchester Combined Authority (GMCA) this week.

If approved, this would take the number of endorsed schemes so far to 57 and will deliver 469 new and upgraded crossings and junctions as well as 127 miles of new cycling and walking routes, to be known as Beeways. This includes 20 miles of Busy Beeways, Dutch-style cycle lanes that are protected from motor traffic.

The latest schemes would bring the total value of proposed cycling and walking related-projects across Greater Manchester to around £339 million. Around £160 million of this funding is from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund with £120 million coming from local contributions. A further £74 million funding will now be sought to fully cover the cost of all of the schemes plus associated programme costs.

Schemes being proposed include a huge £32 million cycling and walking programme for Wigan, including a segregated cycling route along the A49 plus the transformation of several neighbourhoods to make them more people-friendly for on foot and by bike travel. A continuous east-west walking and cycling route in the north and east Manchester city centre fringe serving Ancoats, New Islington and the Green quarter is also proposed. A complete overhaul of the cycling and walking environment is also planned for Salford as well as a major active neighbourhood project in Urmston, where the movement of people is prioritised over the movement of cars.

TfGM has also today published an update on its plans for a GM bike hire scheme, confirming an ambition to launch the first phase in Spring 2020.

Mayor of Greater Manchester, Andy Burnham, said: “A Greater Manchester-wide bike hire scheme will be an integral part of our transport network. If we can get tens of thousands of people doing their first and last mile on a bike or on foot, we’ll be well on our way to creating a more integrated, sustainable and varied transport offer.

“The 15 schemes being proposed today are an exciting next step towards building the Bee Network. When complete it will be the largest joined-up walking and cycling network in the country. We’re embarking on an active travel revolution in Greater Manchester and I’m looking forward to the first Bee Network schemes opening later this year.”

Greater Manchester’s Cycling and Walking Commissioner, Chris Boardman, said: “I couldn’t have imagined when I took up this role two years ago that we’d get to a point where we’re already oversubscribed funding-wise because we have so many high quality schemes being proposed. What a fantastic problem to have. We can crack on with the development and build of a lot of these schemes - and in the meantime we’re going to scale up our campaign to secure further funding and will shortly publish a delivery plan. A true alternative to the car is something that Greater Manchester residents clearly want – that’s why I’m so pleased to announce that our planned network is now longer and more comprehensive than before.”

The 15 new proposed projects being funded as part of the Mayor’s Challenge Fund are:

Bolton
1. Bolton Town Centre Phase 1 (East) - £4.1 million

This project will improve the on foot and by bike experience across a large part of the town centre, including creating seven new crossings, upgrading two junctions, creating two-way cycle tracks on one-way streets, upgrading two subways and delivering more cycle parking.
The scheme is expected to cost in the region of £4.1 million with £3.5 million coming from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund and £0.6 million in local contributions.

Bury
2. Bury Fishpool - £3.6 million

This project will deliver a series of junction improvements, new routes and infrastructure enhancements to connect communities and improve safety in the Fishpool area of Bury.
The scheme is expected to cost in the region of £3.6 million with £3.4 million coming from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund and £0.2 million in local contributions.

Manchester
3. Manchester Northern and Eastern Gateway - £13.2 million

Connecting the neighbourhoods of Ancoats, New Islington, New Cross, New Town, Redbank and the Green Quarter, this scheme will create a high quality, continuous east-west walking and cycling route in the north and east city centre fringe.

The scheme is expected to cost in the region of £13.2 million with £4.2 million coming from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund and £9 million in local contributions.

__Salford __
4. Salford City Centre Package - £28.2 million

This scheme will remove the barriers to cycling and walking in Salford’s city centre, delivering a complete, high-quality walking and cycling network across the entire area, linked to public transport.

The scheme is expected to cost in the region of £28.2 million with £23.1 million coming from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund and £5.1 million in local contributions.

  1. Salford RHS Links - £2 million

This scheme will significantly improve the on foot and by bike experience in the area, improving access to the new RHS Bridgewater Garden, Parr Fold Park, Worsley College and Walkden Train Station.
The scheme is expected to cost in the region of £2 million with £1.3 million coming from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund and £0.7 million in local contributions.

__Stockport __
6. Stockport Heaton Norris Bridge - £6.8 million

VISUALISATION AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD HERE

A new cycling and walking bridge will replace the existing narrow, unattractive pedestrian bridge over the M60 on a key route linking Heaton Norris with Stockport town centre. This scheme also includes a new path within Heaton Norris park, a signalised junction upgrade and one parallel crossing.

The scheme is expected to cost in the region of £6.8 million with £5.8 million coming from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund and £1 million in local contributions.

  1. Stockport Hempshaw Lane – £1.2 million

This scheme will provide new crossings as well as delivering a new walking and cycling route through St. Thomas’ Recreation Ground.

The scheme is expected to cost in the region of £1.2 million with £0.7 million coming from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund and £0.5 million in local contributions.

Tameside
8. Tameside Ashton West Retail Centre Link Bridge - £1.2 million

A new 60 metre cycling and walking bridge will be delivered by this scheme linking existing facilities to the north and south of Manchester Road and Ashton Metrolink. Ramped access will be provided to a wide shared bridge area suitable for all users.

The scheme is expected to cost in the region of £1.2 million with the total cost coming from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund.

  1. Tameside Ashton Streetscape Scheme – £6.1 million

High quality walking and cycling routes will be delivered across and along the A6043 Wellington Road / Albion Way corridor, forming part of Phase 3 of the Vision Tameside public realm works.
The scheme is expected to cost in the region of £6.1 million with £3.5 million coming from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund and £2.6 million in local contributions.

  1. Tameside Ashton South - £1.2 million

VISUALISATION AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD HERE

This scheme will establish cycle routes into and through the town centre and enhance the environment for pedestrians. The scheme will consider the use of contraflow cycle lanes and potentially reversing sections of one-way streets to deter motor vehicles rat running. The scheme will also reduce speed limits, remove unnecessary street furniture and provide additional cycle parking within the town centre.

The scheme is expected to cost in the region of £1.2 million with the total cost coming from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund.

Transport for Greater Manchester
11. GM Safety Camera Digitisation and Upgrade - £9.2 million

The project will reduce road danger by improving red traffic light and speed limit compliance through the replacement of existing safety camera housings and identifying new prioritised locations. The latest technology will assist in improving red-light; spot speed; and average speed compliance rates. This is a Safer Roads Greater Manchester (SRGM) partnership initiative between TfGM, GMP; and GM Local Authorities. The newly prioritised locations will be identified in co-ordination with Bee Network schemes and delivery Partners.

The scheme is expected to cost in the region of £9.2 million with match funding of £400k from SRGM and the remainder from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund.

  1. TfGM Active Neighbourhoods Support - £3.2 million

This scheme involves the development and delivery of 10 active neighbourhoods across Greater Manchester – where the movement of people is prioritised over the movement of motor traffic. The schemes will be delivered by a bespoke team of specialists in close collaboration with the community from the outset. The locations for the active neighbourhoods will identified over the coming weeks.

The scheme is expected to cost in the region of £3.2 million with £2.8 million coming from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund and £0.4 million in local contributions.

Trafford
13. Sale – Sale Moor – Sale Water Park - £10.4 million

VISUALISATION AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD HERE

A safe, high-quality and attractive walking and cycling route will be delivered, linking Sale town centre, the district of Sale Moor and Sale Water Park, connecting with Chorlton, Manchester.

The scheme is expected to cost in the region of £10.4 million with £8.4 million coming from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund and £2.0 million in local contributions.

  1. Trafford Urmston Area Active Neighbourhood - £11.5 million

This major active neighbourhood scheme will significantly improve the walking and cycling environment in the Urmston area. Interventions will be community and stakeholder driven and it is expected that they will include segregated cycle routes, new and upgraded crossings, improved signage, parklets, school street treatments and collision reduction measures.

The scheme is expected to cost in the region of £11.5 million with £11.4 million coming from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund and £0.1 million in local contributions.

Wigan
15. Wigan Standish to Ashton - £32.2 million

VISUALISATION AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD HERE

This scheme will deliver high quality, attractive alternatives to the car along Wigan’s A49 corridor, including segregated cycle lanes and improved crossings. The project will deliver 13 miles of traffic free routes, including almost six miles of resurfaced off-road routes, four miles of refurbished canal towpath, three miles of completely new path on a disused railway line, including Whelley viaduct. Three sets of steps will be replaced with ramps to open up the ‘3 bridges’ link over the canal, river and railway. Around 13 protected junctions on A-roads, three miles of segregated cycle lanes and 13 miles of routes on quiet roads will also be delivered as well as neighbourhood cycle parking and parklets.

The scheme is expected to cost in the region of £32.2 million with £22.2 million coming from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund and £10 million in local contributions.

The £160 million that the Mayor of Greater Manchester has allocated to the Mayor’s Cycling and Walking Challenge Fund has been made possible thanks to national government’s Transforming Cities Fund.

The Transforming Cities Fund aims to improve productivity and spread prosperity through investment in public and sustainable transport in some of the largest English city regions and was first announced on 20 November 2017 by the Prime Minister.

Just the ticket! Pupils take action on air pollution

Lee Howarth

Clean_Air_Day_2019_044_N709.jpg

Thousands of school children across Greater Manchester are taking action to improve air quality at their school gates for Clean Air Day (Thursday 20 June).

Pupils from across the city region are taking to the streets outside their schools to tackle cars parked with their engines running, a large contributor to air pollution. ‘Mini PCSOs’ are patrolling their school zones, presenting fake ‘penalty notices’ to drivers, encouraging them to turn off their engine when they stop. They are also giving them information about how dirty air is affecting all of us and what small changes we can make to reduce it.

Louise Warburton, Bolton Youth Council representative on the Greater Manchester Youth Combined Authority, said: “Across Greater Manchester, dirty air is affecting our health and young people are one of the more vulnerable groups. Today’s activity with more than 80 schools across the region is a chance to spread the message that, if we all make small changes, we can reduce air pollution and clean up Greater Manchester’s dirty air.”

Greater Manchester’s Cycling and Walking Commissioner, Chris Boardman, added: “There’s nothing like the sight of children patrolling their streets to improve air quality to make parents and carers switch off their engines or – better still – make their journey to school without a car.
“It’s fantastic to see young people taking matters into their own hands and it’s been great to visit some schools today to hear about the difference it’s made.”

Clean Air Week (17-23 June 2019) is running across the whole of Greater Manchester, with a range of events taking place to share information and top tips of how we can all play a part in reducing pollution in the air we breathe.

Electric bike and vehicle roadshows are being held across the region, while artist Michael Pinsky’s Pollution Pods are on display at MediaCityUK, where visitors can safely experience the air quality of five different global cities, starting with the clean air of a Norwegian fjord, through to smog and pollution found in London, New Delhi, Beijing and Sao Paolo.

Greater Manchester’s 10 local councils are developing a Clean Air Plan to tackle the major risk that air pollution poses to our health. The proposals include introducing a Clean Air Zone across the whole of Greater Manchester, alongside major government funding to clean up the region’s most-polluting vehicles.

Residents and businesses currently have the chance to give their views on the proposals by responding to a survey on the CleanAirGM.com website. The survey closes at midnight on Sunday 30 June 2019.

Pollution Pods land in Greater Manchester for Clean Air Week 2019

Lee Howarth

Pollution_Pods_by_Michael_Pinsky__1_.jpg

An internationally acclaimed artwork – allowing people to safely experience air pollution and smog from different cities around the world – is set to appear in Greater Manchester to mark the region’s first ever Clean Air Week.

Following stints in London and Vancouver, Michael Pinsky’s immersive Pollution Pods will be appearing in MediaCityUK from Monday 17 until Sunday 23 June.

The installation, brought to you by the Cape Farewell Foundation, will be open for free to the public throughout Clean Air Week, and uses harmless, specially created conditions to simulate the air quality in cities around the world.

Mayor of Greater Manchester Andy Burnham said: “Air pollution is a major public health risk and we have to take urgent steps to tackle the issue in Greater Manchester.

“It’s also vital that we raise awareness of the health impacts of poor air quality. These Pollution Pods provide a really innovative and interesting way of allowing people to safely experience poor air quality for themselves and I would urge anyone who can make it to come along and find out more.

“I’d also encourage people to let us know their thoughts about Greater Manchester’s proposals for tackling poor air quality. A survey is open now online and closes on Sunday 30 June.”

Anyone who does visit the Pollution Pods will pass through a series of climatically controlled domes comparing five contrasting global environments, starting with the truly clean air of Tautra in Norway, through to smog and pollution found in London, New Dehli, Beijing and Sao Paolo, which between them suffer from some of the lowest air quality in the world.

As part of the MRC Festival on Thursday 20 June a team of air quality scientists from Kings College in London will be on site working with Manchester schools to better inform our youngsters what causes pollution and how we all need to be part of the solution – walking to school, bicycling, using clean public transport.

Clean Air Week itself aims to increase awareness of dirty air, which contributes to the equivalent of 1,200 deaths in Greater Manchester each year, as well as the simple changes we can all take to make our region’s air cleaner. This year the focus is on encouraging people to try walking and cycling for more of their short journeys.

Artist Michael Pinsky said: “Art should get people thinking and the Pollution Pods do just that. By taking people through a range of different cities and regions and exposing them to the simulated poor air quality their residents have to live with every day, we hope to raise awareness of this serious issue.

“What we do in the Pollution Pods is completely safe and harmless, but the same cannot be said for the areas we are recreating. Air pollution can seriously affect people’s health and wellbeing so we really need to be thinking about what can be done to tackle this issue.

“There is so much we can do to improve air quality in our cities and I hope the installation inspires people young and old to think about the difference they could make.”

The pods, which are completely free to enter, will be appearing in the Piazza at MediaCityUK and will be open to the public between 10am and 7pm every day from Monday 17 June to Sunday 23 June. They will also be hosting a number of schools from across Greater Manchester on Thursday 20 June – which is national Clean Air Day.

Clean Air Week will see a range of activities take place, from schools events to community roadshows giving people the chance to test drive a range of electric vehicles or get advice on how to do more of their everyday trips on foot or by bike. Every year, around 200 million journeys of one kilometre or less across Greater Manchester are made in a car.

There will also be a meeting of Cycling and Walking Commissioners from across the UK who will be discussing what asks can be made of Government to encourage active travel and help tackle air pollution and congestion.

In order to tackle the major risk that air pollution poses to our health, the 10 local councils in Greater Manchester are developing a Clean Air Plan.

The proposals include a Clean Air Zone across the whole of Greater Manchester, alongside major government funding to clean up the region’s most-polluting vehicles.

The proposals are open to the public to share their opinions on, by responding to a survey until Sunday 30 June 2019.

For more information on the proposals, and to complete the survey, visit www.CleanAirGM.com.

Work starts on the first Bee Network project: Wigan’s Muddy Mile

Lee Howarth

Work has begun to deliver the first scheme as part of Greater Manchester’s Bee Network - a plan for the UK’s largest cycling and walking network launched in 2018 by Cycling and Walking Commissioner Chris Boardman.

Improvement works are now underway on the stretch of waterway in Astley, Wigan, known as the ‘Muddy Mile.’

Funded jointly by the Mayor’s Cycling and Walking Challenge Fund, The Bridgewater Canal Company and Wigan Council, the £212,000 project will deliver the much-needed one mile stretch of surface improvements, as well as better access and signage, plugging a vital gap in the Bridgewater Way.

The works will allow people to cycle on the canal path all the way from Wigan Pier, through Leigh and across the Salford boundary to Monton and Patricroft.

A further project to reinstate the elevated towpath over the Barton Aqueduct is also proposed. Once completed, the Bridgewater Way will then connect to the Trafford Centre, Salford Quays, Manchester city centre and back out to Stretford, Sale and Altrincham, creating a 20-mile continuous multi user route.

The works are now underway and official notices have been posted along the towpath to advise the public of temporary footpath closures, which are necessary for the works to be delivered timely and efficiently. The closure is expected to continue through to June.

Greater Manchester’s Cycling and Walking Commissioner, Chris Boardman, said:
“It’s very exciting to see spades going into the ground on our first Bee Network scheme. We know that this vital missing link has been on residents’ wish lists for a long time and we’re thrilled to be able to help deliver a route that we know will be well used by thousands of people every year.”

Becca Heron, director of economy and skills at Wigan Council said: “We would like to thank local people for their cooperation throughout the duration of these works.

“I am sure everyone who uses this part of the towpath will be happy to see this upgrade take place. We will keep local people informed of any updates as the weeks progress.”

Louise Morrissey, Director of Land and Planning at Peel L&P who own the Bridgewater Canal, said: “The works in Astley are set to make a difference to those who use the canal on a regular basis for pleasure and commuting to their place of work. We look forward to hosting an event to celebrate the official opening of the upgraded section in a few months.”

The £160 million that the Mayor of Greater Manchester has allocated to the Mayor’s Cycling and Walking Challenge Fund has been made possible thanks to national government’s Transforming Cities Fund.

The Transforming Cities Fund aims to improve productivity and spread prosperity through investment in public and sustainable transport in some of the largest English city regions and was first announced on 20 November 2017 by the Prime Minister.

Passenger reminder over bus service changes

Lee Howarth

A major bus timetable change will affect a number of services in the Greater Manchester area from Sunday 28 April.

As a result, bus passengers are being urged to plan their journeys in advance and familiarise themselves with the new schedule.

The new timetables are available to view online on Transport for Greater Manchester’s (TfGM’s) website.

On Friday (26 April) members of the Bus Network and Transport for Greater Manchester Services Sub-Committee will be asked to approve funding that will enable some vital services to continue to operate across Greater Manchester*.

While the majority of the city-region’s bus services are run by commercial operators who are free to decide routes, timetables and set fare levels, TfGM spends millions of pounds a year** to financially support those that run at times of the day and in areas where there is a social need.

Councillor Roger Jones, Chair of the Bus Network and Transport for Greater Manchester Services Sub-Committee, said: “We understand that buses are a vital lifeline for many passengers across Greater Manchester, providing hundreds of millions of journeys per year and accounting for over three quarters of all public transport journeys.

“This is why we continue to work hard to help support bus users and, where possible, maintain transport links in areas where a strong social need is identified.

“We strive to strike the right balance with the resources available to us and provide value for money, whilst endeavouring to ensure vital transport links are maintained to help more people remain connected to family, friends, jobs, health and opportunities.”

For information on public transport across Greater Manchester visit www.tfgm.com, call 0161 244 1000 (7am-8pm, Monday to Friday, and 8am-8pm at weekends and bank holidays) or follow @OfficialTfGM on Twitter.

*58, 68, 415, 501, 507 and 561/2 services, which run in Bolton, Middleton, Oldham, Rochdale, Eccles and the Trafford Centre.

**£27.1m in 2017/18; £26.4m in 2016/17; £27.2m in 2015/16 and £27.3m in 2014/15.

Bumper boost to the Bee Network: £137 million investment announced

Lee Howarth

A total of 18 new cycling and walking schemes with a total value of £137m will be considered by Greater Manchester Combined Authority (GMCA) next week as part of Greater Manchester’s Bee Network.

They represent the single biggest investment in cycling and walking ever announced in the city-region and mean Greater Manchester is investing around £18 per head per year on cycling and walking; one of the highest levels in the UK.

The latest schemes bring the total value of cycling and walking related-projects across Greater Manchester to around £204 million. Around £115 million of this funding is from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund with £88 million coming from local contributions.

If approved this would take the number of endorsed schemes so far to 42 and will deliver 319 new and upgraded crossings and junctions as well as 70 miles of new cycling and walking routes. This includes 14 miles of Dutch-style cycle lanes that are protected from motor traffic.

Schemes being proposed include plans for a £10.7 million cycling and walking corridor in Rochdale, a £11.6 million route between Manchester Piccadilly and Victoria stations, a spectacular 100 metre cycling and walking bridge linking Stockport railway station with the proposed new interchange, plus a £14.6 million bid to revolutionise travel on foot and by bike in Leigh, Atherton and Tyldesley.

Active neighbourhoods, where the movement of people are prioritised over the movement of motor traffic, are also proposed in multi-million pound projects in Levenshulme and Ordsall.

The Mayor of Greater Manchester, Andy Burnham, said: “This is a hugely exciting time for Greater Manchester – we’re just at the start of a process that will see us eventually compete with some of the world’s best and most liveable cities like Vancouver, Copenhagen and New York City. Greater Manchester’s people, along with the 10 districts, have made it pretty clear that enabling more local journeys to happen without cars as part of a wider public transport offer is what is required to support the city-region on so many fronts – congestion, air quality, creating healthier and more connected communities. I’m delighted to be able to launch these plans in Leigh where we’re going to have some really high quality cycling and walking routes linking up local amenities.”

Greater Manchester’s Cycling and Walking Commissioner, Chris Boardman, said: “The 42 schemes that are now on the books are truly transformational. We’ll get a real bang for our buck here in terms of the positive knock-on benefits that will be made possible by this investment.

“Some of the projects, like the proposed active neighbourhood in Levenshulme, have been entirely community-led and driven; the idea for it started by its own residents. More trips on foot or by bike just happen to be a by-product of creating better places to live.”

Transport for Greater Manchester has also proposed an independent research project to investigate using European-style crossings at minor side road junctions to improve safety and enhance the experience for people travelling on foot or by bike. Currently, zebra crossing-style markings are only permitted on UK roads where Belisha Beacons and zig zag markings are also in place and can cost around £30,000. If European-style crossings were to be permitted in the UK it would bring the cost per side road junction down to around £500.

Chris Boardman added: “The majority of European cities use zebra crossings at side roads to give a clear and simple message to drivers that they must give way to people travelling on foot. They are used in cities across the world and now we want to see if this approach can work in Greater Manchester.

“If it can, and with help from Department for Transport, it will enable us to quickly and cheaply ensure that people are much better protected on every-day journeys including trips to school, to the shops, to work.”

The 18 new proposed projects being funded as part of the Mayor’s Challenge Fund are:

Manchester

1. Active neighbourhood in Levenshulme - £2.5 million

The creation of an active neighbourhood in Levenshulme, where the movement of people is prioritised over the movement of motor traffic. The project includes a series of signalised and minor junction upgrades, parallel crossings, modal filters and investment in streetscapes to create a nicer environment for local trips on foot or by bike.

The project will cost in the region of £2.5 million with £2.4 million coming from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund and Manchester City Council contributing £100,000.

2. Upgraded junction at Mancunian Way / Princess Road - £10.6 million

This project involves a full junction upgrade where Mancunian Way meets Princess Road. The existing subways will be removed and protected cycle tracks will be created, as well as pedestrian paths and a signalised crossing.

The full junction upgrade will cost in the region of £10.6 million. £7.7 million will be funded by local contributions with £2.9 million coming from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund, covering the cycling and walking elements.

3. Rochdale canal improvements - £1.3 million

The project involves upgrades to the Rochdale canal corridor linking existing and developing communities. This includes improvements to the canal towpaths, improved access under a low bridge at Butler Street and improved accessibility to four sets of steps.

The project will cost in the region of £1.3 million and will be funded by the Mayor’s Challenge Fund.

4. Piccadilly to Victoria route - £11.6 million

A new cycling and walking route enhancing the on foot and by bike experience from Manchester Piccadilly to Manchester Victoria stations, via the Northern Quarter, will be delivered with a host of public realm improvements.

The project is expected to cost in the region of £11.6 million with £1 million coming from the Government’s Cycle Cities Ambition Grant funding and the remaining £10.6 million from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund.

Rochdale

5. Castleton to Rochdale town centre route phase 2 - £10.7 million

To enhance the existing planned high-quality cycling and walking corridor which will link Rochdale town centre with Castleton, phase 2 of the project involves 0.7 miles of streetscape improvements, a 0.7 mile cycle street, five signalised junction upgrades and 0.6 miles of segregated cycling track.

The project will cost in the region of £10.7 million and is being funded by the Mayor’s Challenge Fund.

Salford

6. Barton aqueduct – traffic-free route between Salford and Trafford Park - £5.3 million

This project will create a new traffic-free route between Salford and Trafford Park. This includes reinstating a historic raised towpath across the Barton aqueduct, two new ramps, towpath widening and surface improvements. Completing a key gap in the Bridgewater Way route, this scheme will link residential communities in Salford with major employment, retail and leisure opportunities in Trafford Park.

The project will cost in the region of £5.3 million with a £4.8 million contribution from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund and £500,000 in local contributions.

7. Liverpool Street cycling and walking corridor - £6.4 million

Creating a continuous safe link between Salford Quays and Manchester city centre, this project enhances the existing Liverpool Street corridor proposals, creating a safe and attractive environment for those travelling on foot or by bike. The project will deliver a 1.4 mile segregated cycle way, three major and 12 minor junction upgrades, six bus stop bypasses, five cycle parking spaces and public realm upgrades.

The project will cost in the region of £6.4 million. It is being funded with a £3.9 million contribution from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund and £2.5 million in local contributions.

8. Active neighbourhood in Ordsall - £2.8 million

The creation of an active neighbourhood in Ordsall where the movement of people is prioritised over the movement of motor traffic, this project will reduce car dependency and rat-running, as well as improving the experience of travelling to public transport hubs. It will deliver 10 junction upgrades, six new parallel crossings and 0.6 miles of light segregated cycle lanes, connecting the city centre with Ordsall riverside and Salford Quays.

The project will cost in the region of £2.8 million with a £2.6 million contribution from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund and £200,000 in local contributions.

Stockport

9. A6 to Manchester Airport Relief Road (A6MARR) cycling and walking improvements - £1.4 million

This project increases the connectivity on foot or by bike of communities near the newly built A6 MARR corridor, including Heald Green, Stanley Green and Bramhall. This includes a 1.4 mile shared walking and cycling path and three new crossings for people walking and cycling.

The project will cost in the region of £1.4 million and is being funded by the Mayor’s Challenge Fund.

10. Hazel Grove and Bramhall link – £4.1 million

Plugging an important gap in the network between Bramhall Park and Hazel Grove, this project will provide over two miles of new safe cycle route protected from traffic on the A5143 Jacksons Lane/Dean Lane including two signalised junction upgrades, seven minor junction upgrades, new crossings for people walking and cycling, bus stop-bypasses and cycle parking.

The project will cost in the region of £4.1 million and is being funded by the Mayor’s Challenge Fund.

11. Cheadle Hulme and Cheadle Heath crossing improvements – £0.7m

Linking Cheadle Hulme and Cheadle Heath, this package of crossings will improve local connectivity making local trips on foot and by bike more attractive. The project includes four junction upgrades, two new crossings for people walking and cycling, 15 cycle parking spaces, two filtered neighbourhoods and one new access ramp.

The project will cost in the region of £700,000 and is being funded by the Mayor’s Challenge Fund.

12. The Heatons cycling and walking improvements - £2.2 million
This project will create quiet routes that will connect the communities of Heaton Chapel, Heaton Moor and Heaton Mersey for journeys on foot and by bike. It will also link the Fallowfield Loop and the Trans Pennine Trail. This includes 1.9 miles of off-road paths, 12 minor junction upgrades, two signalised junction upgrades, new and upgraded crossings for people walking and cycling, modal filter points and cycle parking.

The project will cost in the region of £2.2 million and is being funded by the Mayor’s Challenge Fund.

13. Ladybrook Valley - Cheadle Hulme and Bramhall links – £0.8m

This project will deliver a key missing link in the cycling and walking route in the Ladybrook Valley linking Bramhall, Cheadle Hulme and Cheadle. A 0.9 mile traffic-free cycling and walking path will be created as well as a ramp for access to Bramhall Park Road.

The project will cost in the region of £800,000 and will be funded by the Mayor’s Challenge Fund.

14. Stockport interchange cycling and walking elements - £57 million

This project will deliver a landmark new walking and cycling bridge spanning over 100m metres, providing a major new walking and cycling route linking the rail station, the new bus interchange, and Mersey Square. The project will also create a traffic-free public square, new crossings for people walking and cycling and secure cycle storage.

The projected cost for the Stockport interchange project is in the region of £57 million. The Mayor’s Challenge Fund will contribute £9 million and the remaining £48 million will come from local contributions.

Tameside

15. Crown Point, Denton - £2.5 million

Enabling more people in Denton to travel on foot or by bike, this project will improve the experience at and close to Crown Point junction. It includes a 0.6 mile segregated cycle lane, a 300 metre hybrid lane, one signalised junction upgrade, two parallel crossings, bus stop bypasses and cycle parking.

The project will cost in the region of £2.5 million and is being funded by the Mayor’s Challenge Fund.

Trafford

16. Wharfside and Trafford Park links - £2.8 million

Leading to more local trips on foot and by bike, this project focuses on enhancing the experience of key journeys across Stretford, Trafford Park, Old Trafford and Salford Quays. It will deliver 1.2 miles of segregated cycle lanes, 320 metres of shared use footway, two signalised junction upgrades, four parallel crossings and the conversion of a vehicular lane to a junction that works for people travelling on foot and by bike. It also includes cycle parking.

The project will cost in the region of £2.8 million with £2.7 million coming from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund and £100,000 in local contributions.

Wigan

17. Leigh, Atherton and Tyldesley cycling and walking routes - £14.6 million

Revolutionising the on foot and by bike experience in Leigh, Atherton and Tyldesley, this project will improve the safety and accessibility of the town centres as well as links to business, retail and public transport hubs. It includes 24 new or upgraded crossings, 6.2 miles of segregated cycling lanes, 7.8 miles of shared road paths, 11.2 miles of shared use footway, 16 ‘parklets’ (small on-street mini- parks that typically have seating, planting and bike parking) as well as improvements to the street scape.

The project is expected to cost in the region of 14.6 million with £13.9 million coming from the Mayor’s Challenge Fund and £700,000 in local contributions.

Greater Manchester

18. Greater Manchester bike hire scheme

A proposal to initiate a project to bring forward a GM-wide bike hire scheme will also be considered by the GMCA on 29 March. Further details will be announced in the Spring.